Racism in the modern day nail industry.

Hello everyone,

I have thought long and hard about writing this post and it’s taken me sometime to get round to writing it because of the sensitive nature of it. However a friend recently urged me to speak out on it through my blog and I agreed because I think it’s a post which needs to be raised and discussed. So I’m going ahead and writing it anyway. It’s a controversial post though so it may raise a few eyebrows!

So, rewind to two years ago, and I was a new nail technician- starting out. I was honored to be asked by a friend to compete as a hand model for her entry into a well known nail competition at Olympia in London. It’s a huge event, and taken very seriously in the nail industry. My friend had joined a brand team and was being mentored by a certain well-known local educator from a VERY well known and well respected nail brand. I was also in the process of training with said brand in a range of nail techniques. I knew this local educator, had spent a lot of money with her and was eagerly awaiting more training, so I was happy to get involved in the competition part of it. So my friend and I got to work, practicing like crazy- I wanted her to place well, so I was doing everything I could to grow my nails and look after my hands.

After some weeks my friend tells me that she has been advised by this educator (for top world renowned nail brand who knew me and also knew she was using me as her model) not to use a black, tan or Indian Asian hand model for the competition entry  (I may be paraphrasing somewhat here but) the message generally was that darker skin models won’t win because it doesn’t look good. She should only use Caucasian or very light skinned people to model with! Sorry? What?  I thought hand models were picked for the natural length of the nails and fingers. This is suggesting in effect, that the whole Olympia nail competition (as well as the worldwide nail competition industry) is the same; discriminatory, racist, prejudiced. I doubted the whole industry because of this and wanted nothing more to do with it.

I had never in my life heard anything as so blatantly prejudice and racist as this. I was sickened and disgusted. A well-known educator and nail ‘personality’ who people know and respect, someone who spent much of their career bragging about equality would say such a thing?

It’s disgusting; it’s disgraceful and everything in-between. It’s all the swear words under the sun and more. It’s racist and bigoted. This was someone I had previously liked and looked up to saying this so for me it was a huge kick in the teeth.  It’s also hypocritical because this person was a so-called ambassador for equality within the nail industry. I was shocked. I immediately disassociated myself from her, and the brand who she works for. I also disassociated myself from her training facility in London and cancelled all further training and (mysteriously) although I didn’t ever complain or contact her directly about it I was contacted by one of her minions and given a refund on all deposits paid on courses.

Really and truly it’s sad that in this day and age, darker skinned people aren’t seen as beautiful too. Instead they are considered ugly, not fit to model, not to be seen on the catwalks…. not fit to hand model!!!!  As I’m writing this, I’m finding myself livid all over again that this even happened.

It’s a sensitive post yes and I’m frustrated because I can’t actually directly name and shame the nail brand publicly, but this experience shaped my nail career, it massively changed my outlook on nails, and the industry in general. It made me feel like because of my skin colour I couldn’t participate in competitions and made me feel like my skin colour wasn’t pretty enough to hand model. I never did get to find out for certain whether this is the view of the nail competition scene in general- I didn’t stay around long enough to find out, but I do know that people of colour rarely appear as hand models in these competitions and place- you just have to look back at the past winners to see that.

So why didn’t I complain formally? Why didn’t I broadcast it to anyone who would listen, I hear you all cry?!  Well the honest answer is- at the time I didn’t feel I could. I didn’t think it would be believed. I was a new nail tech starting out in the nail game and I didn’t feel I had a voice! The friend who told me what was said dropped out of competing after all in disgust and asked me not to make a formal complaint. The educator in question is a family favourite with this nail brand and a well known face on the nail scene. We basically felt they would simply ‘Spin’ the story to discredit us and make it seem either like a mountain was being made from a molehill or simply that we were liars. This post has been therapeutic to say the least because clearly I still carry hard feelings about it but largely I’m over it. I’ve moved on. However I would never train or buy with this brand ever again and I wish when I see others praising this individual that I could scream from the hills what she really is.

If you haven’t already guessed the nail brand, I would like to say they are well known worldwide and originate from the U.S.A – I would like to think their representatives in other countries aren’t so disgraceful but who knows. I’m so sorry for being cryptic but let’s just say when it comes to feeling respect from them – I didn’t and the love I did feel was short-lived!

Feel free to like, share, comment and spread the word on this one- it shouldn’t really be swept under the rug. If any of you have experienced similar don’t feel you can’t speak out. It should not be tolerated at all!

Until next time,

Mwah

xxx

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49 thoughts on “Racism in the modern day nail industry.

    • Dear Aisha – I am Alex Fox the editor of Scratch magazine and the organiser for the last 11 years of Nailympia London, the competition you cite in your blog. I am shocked to read this account of what occurred to you. I can assure you this is NOT the case and has never been the case with Nailympia. It is an international event – embracing all nail professionals from around the globe – whatever colour or creed. In fact I pride myself in being an open and all-embracing platform. Hence every year the judging panel is an eclectic mix of nail experts from all over the globe as are the competitors and their models. I have seen many people of color over the years in this competition. Whatever you were told, it was not on mine or my team’s behalf i can honestly tell you. My love of the nail industry and my love for people means i have enjoyed 17 years in this industry and am saddened that you were cut short in your love and passion by one person’s uneducated opinion. YES you have a voice and always did – please feel free to email me at any time – if you would like to discuss this further – my email is alex.xx.fox@gmail.com – i would love to talk with you and to communicate with you one-on-one to make this situation better. Thank you for speaking out – as i really had no idea this type of thing occurred and certainly not associated with the competition that I’m so very proud to run every year. I look forward to hearing from you – love Alexxxxx

      ps- when nails are judged that are judged on their shape, form, style, structure, beauty and most of all ‘consistency’ across all 10 nails – this is what the nail competition is for – it’s about skills.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Hello Alex, it is reassuring to hear from you as I think this important issue needs looking into and challenging. I have heard on more than one occasion that this has become the way of thinking that when it comes to hand models, that people of colour should not be used and I wonder why this opinion has come about. When this al happened my friend and I looked back through all the past winners and could find maybe one model who was tan skin and that was all. It’s very sad because many people of colour have beautiful hands and nails so I would expect to see more of them. I will email you shortly. Thanks again for reading and replying is good to hear that this view isn’t supported at the top. X

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      • Akex how many times have we seen black hands featuring on Scratch Magazine. Can we walk the walk if we are going to talk the talk

        Liked by 1 person

  1. I hate knowing thay there are such petty minds out there that descriminate darker skin. I think dark skin is as beautiful as light skin. I have personally been called ugly because I tent to be very pale at times. Such comments are laughable.
    Thank you for speaking up! No one should feel voiceless. No one should be voiceless. Kudos to you for this post!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you so much- and what happened to you is awful! it’s just as disgraceful to say that pale skin is ugly as dark skin- it’s unacceptable and just plain silly- everyone is beautiful just the way they are!! Xxx

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Aisha, Don’t allow the small minded oafs to make you feel anything less than beautiful in your own skin.
    They, my friend, are not worth your feelings.
    #beautifulinsideandout

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Aisha I never knew of this!! I’m absolutely disgusted and appalled! I think I know who said brand is…. It’s so sad that racism so blatant as that still exists! Try telling this to the beautiful Asian hand models who show off their henna tattoos. All shades of colour are lovely and clearly this imbecile must be colour blind xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes I think you probably do know who it is holly and I totally agree- Some of the beautiful hands I see modelling henna I’m in awe as they have such lovely nails!!! Stunning!! Xxx

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  4. Aisha, I’m glad that you have finally spoken out about this. It’s incredible in this day and age. I know who this relates to and have lost all respect for them. xx

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “We basically felt they would simply ‘Spin’ the story to discredit us and make it seem either like a mountain was being made from a molehill or simply that we were liars”

    Yep.

    They seem to do that a lot… Xx

    Liked by 2 people

  6. This is awful, how dare they behave in this way and make you feel like that. It’s just horrible and so small minded. We should all celebrate and love ourselves for who and what we are and no one should be able to down anyone else like that. I think you have been very dignified in not naming and shaming. However, not speaking up may allow them to continue with this type of unacceptable behaviour. Maybe a letter to them would focus their attention. I’ve narrowed it down to two possible companies, but I wish I knew for sure who it was because I would make sure I never buy another product from them.

    All power to you beautiful lady, never let ignorant idiots get to you, you are worth far more x

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know- Glynis it was a tough call on whether I should name and shame and face possible bullying and intimation to take my post down from them or whether to keep quiet. Because my friend was involved to I opted to keep quiet in the end but oh how I want to call them out. It still upsets me now thinking about it! Thank you so much for your kind words and support- it’s so true we should all love ourselves and each other just for who we are xxx

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you nishi, I really want to contact them but maybe too much time has passed now?! I debated about it for so long at the time because I couldn’t believe what I was hearing! Sad times. Thanks for reading and your support xx

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  7. I’m not sure what I feel most saddened by, whether it is the fact of the matter that I’m confident that I know the company that you are taking about and pretty sure of the educator without you naming names, or whether this exists in the industry. Either way, I am not surprised unfortunately but I am very very disheartened by it. Kudos to you for taking a stance and speaking up, that’s incredible. Maybe one day I will be able to do the same, but I can’t see it being any day soon xxxxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes Natasha I think your guess would be correct sadly- I do hope one day you do speak out on your experience because no one should feel they can’t but I also know the feeling of not wanting to or not feeling able to, which is why I couldn’t name and shame directly! Nevertheless one day I look forward to reading your story xxx

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  8. Aisha,
    I’m so sorry to hear of your experience.
    As a nail tech and educator I’m saddened to hear you were made to feel this way. I too have entered nail competitions and have also judged in recent years ( I haven’t judged the comp you mentioned but have entered it in the past). I can honestly say I haven’t experienced racism or even people that share the professional opinion that Caucasian models are better suited. In most cases it’s actually the opposite and many competitors actually prefer to work with Asian models who generally have longer nail beds.
    For most competing is about winning and to do this they will use the best model available to them regardless of race.
    Competitors use a cream red polish and French colours and are taught to use shades that compliment the models skin.
    I’m sorry again that your experience was bad and that a select few spoiled it for you. I’ve seen nail competitions worldwide and experienced quite the opposite, with competitors actively seeking to use non Caucasian models.
    Thank you for speaking out. It’s important we know of incidents like this and it highlights that mentoring nail competitors is something that should be done by people with an in depth knowledge of the competition circuit.
    I hope you never experience such a thing in our industry again.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Belinda- this is so reassuring to read as I never again got involved with the competition side of the industry because of this. I wouldn’t ever want to hand model again because of this and I was deeply disheartened this happened so early on in my career. To hear that this is not general opinion is very reassuring and warming as I really hoped it wasn’t the case. Thank you for your support xxx

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  9. How shocking and disgusting . . . Well done for sharing your experience. Everyone should be aware of the level of prejudice which still exists so as a society we can continue to strive for better xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  10. well this is awful and good for you for disassociating yourself from this shoddy company. A good nail artist embraces all different skin tones. Creates designs which flatter and compliment the clients skin. I follow Simply into MY NAILS on YouTube and her dark skin looks so beautiful and she knows which colours work well with her skin and she creates some fabulous nail designs. I’ve tried copying her colour palette and it looks awful on my skin. If anything is say my pale skin really limits the colour range I can use. I say two fingers up to this “international brand” and find yourself a brand which embraces and celebrates everyone for the skin they are in. You could always start a YouTube channel seeking out the best most up to date nail lines out there which totally rock with your skin tone. I’d subscribe to that!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ha ha thank you Kerry – yes I ended up so angry I refused to buy from them again- but also disheartened about the industry as I would of loved to progress to competitions but this just put me off! Yes about the YouTube I’m a bit camera shy though and can’t stand hearing my own voice back again!! Thanks for your support and kind words- they are so true!

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  11. could this not have been a misunderstanding or miscommunication? After all, it is a third hand account of something from years ago? Also, the educator you are commenting about mentors teams at Olympia that always use a mix of models, predominantly Asian (which this story would contradict).

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    • Thank you for the response Samuel. Unfortunately this was definitely not a misunderstanding, I saw it with my own eyes 😞. I’m not writing this post to get anyone into trouble it’s more to raise awareness on the prejudice which is clearly still so prevalent in this industry and so others aren’t left feeling how I felt.

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      • There are many reasons why I would question some of these points, but the largest is purely factual. You state that this person recommended against using anyone other than a Caucasian, but she brings in large groups of competitors to the very competition you are talking about. None of their models are Caucasian. They are almost all Asian (which apparently she recommended against using). So either we are not talking about the same person, or clearly there is a misunderstanding/miscommunication. Wouldn’t you agree?

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      • To be honest I am unsure what what/who you are referring too or what you want me to say really, I can only reiterate there was no misunderstanding, I saw it with my own eyes and this was devastating to me. Quite frankly it was attitudes and comments like this which made me feel nervous to speak out for fear of being discredited or bullied into backing down and accepting prejudice. Racism should never ever be ignored, supported, swept under the rug or minimised. I am not in the wrong here, the person who said this is and while I am lucky that most people have been extremely empathetic and supportive it’s comments like this which show that clearly not everyone is of the same view.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Basically Sam Sweet you are calling her a LIAR!
    Shame on you. This should be taken seriously NOT dismissed. Oh but yeh your a white man, what do you know smh

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you. There would be absolutely no benefit to me to lie, or make this up and I would never blog on something so serious unless I had proof. This is my space to write not to argue. And also distracting from the real message behind the post- #saynotoracism xx

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I really wasn’t going to say anything. I was just going to continue to support my friend in my own way like I have been since this whole thing happened, and keep out anything public but- meh! Having to go through it again has brought back some ill feelings, and it’s time some light is shed on a very real problem in the industry.

    First off, this beautifully worded blog post was written from real, raw emotion. Aisha clearly felt (and still feels) strongly about this incident. The point of this post was to bring awareness and encourage others who have had something similar happen not to take it sitting down- not to name and shame. Naming and shaming, although it would be a huge weight lifted off her chest, would serve no purpose other than to start a fight. So I think for someone to make it a point to try and guess who said it, and pick apart every aspect of the story for whatever reason is insensitive. I can understand someone wanting to know and having their suspicions because they have a company to protect, but playing devil’s advocate is not the way to go about it. Empathy, sympathy and respect would’ve been appropriate. Certain people had their suspicions, but overall, majority of the audience to this blog are not nail technicians and are not in the know, so knowing would not mean donkey **** to them. There are quite a handful of international nail brands in the UK. It could be any of them, yet only the face of one is present, questioning the whole incident.

    Secondly, racism is racism. Doesn’t matter who said it, why they said it, etc. The point is prejudice and discrimination was directed against a different race based on the belief that said race possesses a certain quality, characteristic or ability that deemed them inferior. It’s archaic, shameful, hurtful, despicable, pathetic, immoral, inappropriate, and highly ignorant to say the least. The person who made the offending comments should be ashamed because for whatever reason the comments were made, there was simply no need for it, especially seeing that he/she seems to hold such high esteem in that industry and supposedly speaks against prejudice and equality, themselves. Seems highly hypocritical.

    Finally, I am that friend mentioned in this post. I was the one who both told Aisha about the comments and showed her proof immediately after it happened. I had to show her. I didn’t dare repeat it word for word because the words were so shockingly terrible. Make no mistake, there was no misunderstanding or fabricating any of it. Why would there be a need to? What would be gained from doing that? It was clear. It was direct. It was blunt, and expressed in a way where I truly believed this person meant and felt every word of it. I’ve heard of this “unwritten rule” from multiple sources, but never in this fashion. Why did I bring it up with Aisha? She’s my friend. She was willing to take time out her busy life to help me, and she needed to see exactly why I was suddenly dropping out giving up. I wanted her to know I wasn’t making it up or taking things out of context. It was crystal clear and ugly, and I wanted no part of it. The offending comments were made in private to only a select few. When word got out “an outsider” was made aware, an indirect threat was made towards me. Why didn’t we take it further? For this exact reason- it will be picked apart and we would be discredited. The whole thing would be swept under the rug. That would hurt more than the incident, itself.

    Again, this whole post which someone has requested Aisha to write is about racism in the nail industry. It exists. It’s very real. And this is only one of many stories related to the topic. The only moral thing to do is to bring it to light and stand against it, not point fingers.

    Liked by 3 people

    • EDIT: The person who made the offending comments should be ashamed because for whatever reason the comments were made, there was simply no need for it, especially seeing that he/she seems to hold such high esteem in that industry and supposedly speaks against prejudice and preaches equality, themselves

      Liked by 1 person

    • Very well put, there really is nothing more to say on it here. Yes I may have paraphrased somewhat and yes word for word it might be a bit off but this is my blog, my space my inner personal thoughts and feelings. I am still very hurt and offended about what happened and some of this post may have showed that but regardless, I didn’t want to name and shame and I didn’t want to quote unquote, that’s not the point of this post. I will not engage in any more arguing here and as far as I’m concerned it’s not up for debate any longer. This happened. Fact. There is proof of this. I don’t mind who does or doesn’t believe it either to be honest. It’s my story, that is all. The sensible reactions would be ones of empathy and open questioning- not publicly minimising, belittling in an aggressive manner. If anything this post (and subsequent comments) highlights what clearly is an industry wide issue of people not feeling able to speak out. Feeling scared or afraid. Bullied or picked on. Me feeling like I have to justify myself, my words and my legitimate feelings. So in effect it supports what the whole post was getting at anyway! I hope this puts it to bed now.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Alisha, please let me start by saying that my comments are my own and nAlisha, please let me start by saying that my comments are my own and not representative of anyone I may represent or associate with.
        I understand that a blog is a genuine way to express your feelings, sometimes positive, sometimes negative.
        There is nothing wrong with bringing your personal thoughts and experiences to the masses, it is often cathartic.
        Firstly, I want to address the issue at hand, not necessarily your experience, but a general one.
        I have worked at the top end of both international competitions and session work.
        Session work can be a dark place, the fashion industry is not always known for being politically correct.
        I have worked closely with the biggest model of colour in the world for 8 years.
        I have seen first hand how frustrating it can be when you are fighting a stream of decisions that appear to be made in the colour of your skin.
        Secondly, I was on the competition circuit in the UK and internationally for 15 years.
        I competed at the Nailympics from its start until my retirement from competition 6 years ago .
        I have judged many competitions as well.
        Most importantly to this issue, I worked closely with the person that you are referring to being racist.
        I was asked to give competition training to a team of students that were hoping to enter the Nailympics in London.
        I worked on 2 seperate days with a mixed team of south East Asian and Caucasian English girls, mainly going over the practical skills and the difference between a salon nail and a competition nail.
        There were a few discussions on what constitutes a good hand model.
        1) beautiful nail beds
        2) reliable to not drop out
        3) calm personality
        4) straight hands/fingers

        Skin tone or colour was/is not in the remit.

        However, my main reason for posting is not to discredit your experience or defend my colleague as I wasn’t aware of anything of this sort being said.
        It is to add balance to your bigger claim of racism in the industry.
        This is a big claim, and one that most of us with any influence will take seriously.
        As someone with a LOT of experience in the competition work, I would have welcomed you asking me a direct question on this.
        Why take someone’s comment and assume that the whole competition industry shares that comment?
        I can assure you that when judging The skin colour is irrelevant, it is the shape of the hands/fingers/ nails that will lend themselves to accentuating the nail professionals work.
        Your friend says she wants to see black hands as the winning nails-
        That is going to happen when someone with the relevant skill does a winning set of nails on a model of colour.
        There isn’t anything contrived, there aren’t white judges screwing their noses up at the models of darker skins, when sitting on a judging panel, or talking to other judges/competitors, this has 100% never been brought up in my company.
        The only possible thing I can think of is that even skin tone is preferable when doing a photographic competition, a suitable model would be sourced, whatever colour, but as I know from my session work, some darker skins have more obvious darker areas of pigmentation, that isn’t racist, it’s stating a physical fact.
        I don’t think anyone wanted to discredit your experience, but I for one wanted to add my actual solid experience of these parts of our industry and I welcome you to continue on with the professional path that you are taking, I pushed through a lot of barriers to get to where I am, I didn’t come from s place where people end up doing the things I have done, but determination will always win over anything else 😊
        ot representative of anyone I may represent or associate with.
        I understand that a blog is a genuine way to express your feelings, sometimes positive, sometimes negative.
        There is nothing wrong with bringing your personal thoughts and experiences to the masses, it is often cathartic.
        Firstly, I want to address the issue at hand, not necessarily your experience, but a general one.
        I have worked at the top end of both international competitions and session work.
        Session work can be a dark place, the fashion industry is not always known for being politically correct.
        I have worked closely with the biggest model of colour in the world for 8 years.
        I have seen first hand how frustrating it can be when you are fighting a stream of decisions that appear to be made in the colour of your skin.
        Secondly, I was on the competition circuit in the UK and internationally for 15 years.
        I competed at the Nailympics from its start until my retirement from competition 6 years ago .
        I have judged many competitions as well.
        Most importantly to this issue, I worked closely with the person that you are referring to being racist.
        I was asked to give competition training to a team of students that were hoping to enter the Nailympics in London.
        I worked on 2 seperate days with a mixed team of south East Asian and Caucasian English girls, mainly going over the practical skills and the difference between a salon nail and a competition nail.
        There were a few discussions on what constitutes a good hand model.
        1) beautiful nail beds
        2) reliable to not drop out
        3) calm personality
        4) straight hands/fingers

        Skin tone or colour was/is not in the remit.

        However, my main reason for posting is not to discredit your experience or defend my colleague as I wasn’t aware of anything of this sort being said.
        It is to add balance to your bigger claim of racism in the industry.
        This is a big claim, and one that most of us with any influence will take seriously.
        As someone with a LOT of experience in the competition work, I would have welcomed you asking me a direct question on this.
        Why take someone’s comment and assume that the whole competition industry shares that comment?
        I can assure you that when judging The skin colour is irrelevant, it is the shape of the hands/fingers/ nails that will lend themselves to accentuating the nail professionals work.
        Your friend says she wants to see black hands as the winning nails-
        That is going to happen when someone with the relevant skill does a winning set of nails on a model of colour.
        There isn’t anything contrived, there aren’t white judges screwing their noses up at the models of darker skins, when sitting on a judging panel, or talking to other judges/competitors, this has 100% never been brought up in my company.
        The only possible thing I can think of is that even skin tone is preferable when doing a photographic competition, a suitable model would be sourced, whatever colour, but as I know from my session work, some darker skins have more obvious darker areas of pigmentation, that isn’t racist, it’s stating a physical fact.
        I don’t think anyone wanted to discredit your experience, but I for one wanted to add my actual solid experience of these parts of our industry and I welcome you to continue on with the professional path that you are taking, I pushed through a lot of barriers to get to where I am, I didn’t come from s place where people end up doing the things I have done, but determination will always win over anything else 😊

        Like

      • Liza- I thank you for your comments and I see where you and other industry influencers are coming from of course, yet, I beg to differ on some of them. I don’t really want to get into any more debates on my blog but if you had seen what I have then you would understand. I can only assure you that:
        A) I didn’t necessarily write about all of the awful comments and statements made during this whole ugly affair. It would make it blatantly obvious whom I speak of and I did not wish to identify the person, therefore, I can only just touch upon the parts which affected me most.
        B) In my post, I have questioned whether or not this is merely the view of individual or entire industry. I haven’t concluded that it is. However, I have heard from many nail techs since then who have told me that this is a known under current to the competition industry. Also, you cannot blame anyone for questioning the under representation of black and minority ethnic groups within the nail industry as a whole. Models, competition entrants, photographic models and so on and so on. For me, personally, I wouldn’t bother trying at all within the competition arena- (entrant or model) because I would feel at an immediate disadvantage to my competitors or I would be afraid to place the person I was modelling with at a disadvantage because of the colour of my skin. I have no areas of pigmentation, for instance. I have long nail beds, long fingers so on and so forth, yet in this case my friend was discouraged from using me for no other reason than I was black. This was news to me- I never would of thought this could be a factor!

        I was painted out to be a liar earlier and anyone who knows me knows I am anything but that. Instead, I am an individual who supports others, helps wherever possible and champions the truth! Yes, this is my blog, you are right- it’s my space to write about my genuine experience- not to tell lies. What happened, happened. This is fact and it is not OK and should not be minimised or discredited. Unless you have suffered such prejudice based on appearance, I don’t think can ever know how bad I felt. you may well of heard some eye raising comments in your time working with top models of colour and I am pleased you are one of the ones who has in effect worked to promote black beauty. I will happily speak more about this in private as I agreed to with Alex.

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  14. Pingback: Racism in the modern day nail industry. — Lipstick & Daydreams | cheemsphotos

  15. Hey people,

    Now I’m not in the nail or make up industry, but my partner Aisha Simone is and I have been through this whole ordeal with her from the start of it all.

    Now racism exists in this world, no matter what industry that you work in that’s just the world for you, no matter how much we discourage,campaign and fight against it, it will always be there. I think what Aisha has done by highlighting this issue is very admirable and most who have suffered what she has suffered would normally stay quiet and carry on suffering in silence. She has shared with all what she has been thorough, I feel to show you ask that it still does exist.

    What I find worrying is that people are still around trying to brush these issues under the carpet like it’s not a big issue, what is even more worrying is the people who are doing the brushing are in positions of power.

    People like that Sam Sweet geezer (who is he?? 😐)who are quick to jump to the defence of an “unnamed” person did make me wonder? This blog post didn’t accuse anyone directly, it highlighted issues that are prominent, raisung awareness as we should all be doing. also you are suggesting it to be a misunderstanding without actually knowing what has happened?

    I think some equality and diversity training wouldn’t go a miss for some people.

    Listen I just wanted to say a little something, I don’t wanna get into any back and forth with anyone in this, cause I don’t want this issue to distract away from the real reason why the blog was created………. Make up and beauty I believe.

    Cheems

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Literally couldn’t believe this sort of thing would still happen in 2016! It’s actually crazy that any brand would be OK about it at all. I for one think you are gorgeous so are your hands (saw them in your video 😂). Hats off to you for writing such a strong post that is clearly needed. Xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Ummm, there are too many options to purchase professional products from. I want to know the Brand; so I can eliminate them as an option for further purchasing. I think to shine a spotlight on the actions of people who bully is appropriate.

    Liked by 1 person

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